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CFHILL at
Frieze Art Fair London

 

Looking at Frieze Art Fair London

Visiting an art fair is one of the most exhausting and fun experiences curious people in general, and passionate art lovers in particular, can have.

Whoever you are, remember this: At the prestigious Frieze Art Fair London it’s painfully pricey to rent a booth (supposedly, it will set you back from $120,000 to $275,000 and beyond) which means gallerists bring only the most exquisite of works to the fair. One can only expect the best.

Here are some of the greatest highlights that caught our eye in the latest rendition of Frieze London, running through 3–6 October 2019.

Sandro Botticelli ,  Portrait of Michael Marullus Tarchaniota , 1496, tempera on panel, transferred onto canvas, 49 x 35 cm. Courtesy of Trinity Fine Art, London

Sandro Botticelli, Portrait of Michael Marullus Tarchaniota, 1496, tempera on panel, transferred onto canvas, 49 x 35 cm. Courtesy of Trinity Fine Art, London


The Goldmine!

One of the best things about a big-time art fair is the opportunities it offers to see recently rediscovered masterpieces. The sensational work on display this year may not measure up to Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi from a few years back, but it is more well-preserved.

At Frieze Masters the audience can admire a portrait by Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli, the genius who created the huge Primavera, which is on display at the Uffizi in Florence. Botticelli’s works are easily recognised thanks to his pure, crispy colouration and serene facial expressions. This gem is a portrait of the Greek refugee, soldier and poet Michele Marullo. It’s dated 1496, and shown by Trinity Fine Art, who even have created an extensive web page to tell the stories of both the artist and the subject.

Ming Smith,   Red Hot Jazz Europe , 1982. Courtesy: Jenkins Johnson Gallery, New York

Ming Smith, Red Hot Jazz Europe, 1982. Courtesy: Jenkins Johnson Gallery, New York

The artist Ming Smith is presented also at Frieze Masters, in the carefully curated section Spotlight. She is the first African-American female photographer to have her work acquired by the Museum of Modern Art, in 1975. As a photographer, Ming Smith documents everyday moments in her ethereal and transcendent works. Combining a deliberate blurriness with experimental post-production techniques, Smith’s work includes double-exposed prints, collages, and paintings, which all amplify the dream-like qualities of her photographs.

Keep Yourself Updated!
It might sound a bit odd that there is a generous side to a well-curated art fair, but the fairs have actually become considerably more educational and progressive of late than was previously imaginable. This development is surely explained by the PR opportunities involved, and the chance it offers for bringing exposure to highly interesting artists who haven’t yet been completely exploited.

If you don’t yet know about feminist pioneer Howardena Pindell, you really should! Fortunately, at Frieze, there are a number of key works from the 1970s by Pindell on show. She was a founding member of the feminist space A.I.R. Her works are shown at Garth Greenan Gallery. 

Howardena Pindell ,  Night Flight , 2015–16, mixed media on canvas, 1.9 x 1.6 m. Courtesy of the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

Howardena Pindell, Night Flight, 2015–16, mixed media on canvas, 1.9 x 1.6 m. Courtesy of the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York

Woven!
A significant trend within the art field at the moment is the increasing interest that’s being taken in artists working in textile. CFHILL is no exception here. Our visitors have seen textile works by the likes of Liselotte Watkins and Norberg & Sundén, and shortly, we’ll be showing masters of the medium like Noa Eshkol and the grand lady of textile art, Sheila Hicks, the latter of which was the one to ignited the hype to begin with. This year, Frieze has its own textile section, Woven, with no fewer than eight solo presentations. 

Pacita Abad,   The village where I came from , 1991. Courtesy: Silverlens Gallery

Pacita Abad, The village where I came from, 1991. Courtesy: Silverlens Gallery


Karin Mamma Andersson – Best Booth
Wednesday marked the day for the announcement of the best booth of the fair. The winner was Stephen Friedman Gallery, which is welcome news to us as one of the two exhibiting artist was Swede Mamma Andersson. Congratulations! Her work Cuckoo Hill depicts a desolate patch of Nordic countryside, displaying little in the way of signs of modern life, and her equally mysterious The Mare Reminds of the Night features an ominous, blood-red landscape strewn with large boulders. These works are accompanied by four paintings of classical cupids rendered in brooding colours, presented as ghostly apparitions of a former time in history. 

Installation views: Presentation of solo projects by artist  Mamma Andersson  and Brazilian artist  Tonico Lemos Auad . Stephen Friedman Gallery, Stand C10 at Frieze London. Courtesy Stephen Friedman Gallery.

Installation views: Presentation of solo projects by artist Mamma Andersson and Brazilian artist Tonico Lemos Auad. Stephen Friedman Gallery, Stand C10 at Frieze London. Courtesy Stephen Friedman Gallery.

Mamma Andersson ,  Cupido 1–4 , 2019. Oil on panel. Copyright Mamma Andersson. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.

Mamma Andersson, Cupido 1–4, 2019. Oil on panel. Copyright Mamma Andersson. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.

Cover photo:
Donna Huanca, installation view at Simon Lee Gallery's booth at Frieze London, 2019.
Photo by Ocula and Charles Roussel.
Courtesy of the artist, and Simon Lee Gallery, and Peres Projects, Berlin.

Frieze Art Fair London runs through October 6, 2019.