kusama_artiklar.jpg

Upcoming Exhibiton:

Ten by Ten

 

CFHILL Presents – the First Five out of Ten Artists

 

Yayoi Kusama, 2016. Photo: Toshifumi Kitamura.

Queen of Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama (b. 1928), is often singled out by the elite of the art world as the world’s greatest living artist. This places her alongside stars like Picasso, Duchamps, Jackson Pollock, and Andy Warhol, to latter of which she is not seldom compared with. As she approaches 90 years of age, her tricks with mirrors and dots continue to dazzle the world.

 

 
  Lucio Fontana, 1959. Photo: Wikipedia Common.

Lucio Fontana, 1959. Photo: Wikipedia Common.

He Changed the Course of Art History with his Knife

Lucio Fontana (1899—1967) saw flaws in the modernist project. After the Second World War, Europe was devastated, and its vision of purity and perfection had been dealt a mortal blow. That particular blow, embodied as a razor-sharp blade slicing through the canvas, like skin, would become his characteristic signature.


 
   
  
   Normal 
   0 
   
   
   21 
   
   
   false 
   false 
   false 
   
   SV 
   X-NONE 
   X-NONE 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   
   
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
   
 
 /* Style Definitions */
 table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Normal tabell";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-priority:99;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0cm;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	line-height:115%;
	mso-pagination:none;
	mso-hyphenate:none;
	text-autospace:ideograph-other;
	font-size:11.0pt;
	font-family:"Arial",sans-serif;
	mso-font-kerning:1.5pt;
	mso-ansi-language:EN-US;
	mso-fareast-language:ZH-CN;
	mso-bidi-language:HI;}
 
   Gösta Adrian-Nilsson. Foto: TT.

Gösta Adrian-Nilsson. Foto: TT.

Gay, Brilliant, and Brave

Gösta Adrian-Nilsson (1884—1965) never quite fitted in. This man from Lund, who was seduced by the powerful movements in Berlin and Paris, both because of their aesthetics and because of the actual lifestyles, which represented an opportunity to interact (although covertly secret) with other non-conventional, homosexual and liberal-minded people. In conservative Sweden, progress was much slower. His art is highly appreciated today, and it’s unlikely that there have ever been made any more dazzling and vivid depictions of the thrills of big city life.

  Pierre Alechinsky, 1977. Photo: Courtesy CMOA archives.

Pierre Alechinsky, 1977. Photo: Courtesy CMOA archives.

Playful and Anarchic

Belgian artist Pierre Alechinsky (b. 1927) has been called an abstract expressionist. However, it seems more precise to call his savage canvases lyrical abstractions. Brilliant patches of colour, living their own secretive lives. Like clouds in the sky, in constantly shifting formations. Unexpectedly, his inspiration came from medieval illuminated manuscripts. Yes, the intense colours are the same. His paintings are always full of life and play.

 

 
  Self portrait taken outside Zorngården in Mora. © Zornmuseet

Self portrait taken outside Zorngården in Mora. © Zornmuseet

A Master in an Age of Transition

Impressionism, French influences, and national romantic folklore. Most people are very familiar with Anders Zorn (1860—1920). Right? But modernism didn’t pass this stubborn, divinely talented artist by unnoticed. The influence is there; you just have to look carefully for it. Soon, you’ll get your chance at CFHILL!

 
 

Our favourite recurring exhibition, Ten by Ten, is back May 4. Ten extraordinary works, presented in one context. We won’t be revealing the specific works yet, but we will give you some of the names of the artists this week, and the rest next week.